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Below is a list of tree species in the Liberian rain forest ( click image for more details on a specific wood )

		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Ceiba pentandra </li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Burseraceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Enia (Ivory Coast), Banda (Sierra Leone), Ghé (Liberia), Okha (Nigeria), Doum, Bouma, Odouma (Cameroon, Gabon), Fuma (Congo Rep), Cotton wood</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> -  Found in all tropics, more or less scattered in secondary forest formations</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - Sapwood and heartwood not clearly demarcated, wood is whitish, pale brown, or pinkish-brown, often with yellowish or grayish streaks; texture coarse; grain interlocked, occasionally irregular; luster low; without characteristic odor or taste</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> -  Very light, with air-dry density of 320 kg/m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> -  Non-durable, very susceptible to attack by decay fungi and insects, requires rapid harvest and conversion to prevent deterioration, liable to powder-post beetle attack, prone to stain </li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Weak</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Small </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - The tree in grows in all forest parts of Liberia but more abundant in secondary formation and around settlements. </li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Heartwood not resistant to decay and is vulnerable to termite attack; sapwood liable to attack by powder-post beetles. Logs must be protected with insecticides and fungicides and converted as soon as possible.</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Plywood, block-board, boxes and crates, joinery, furniture components</li>
		  </ul>

Ceiba pentandra


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Celtis spp (aldolfi-friederiei)</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Ulmaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Esa (Ghana), Ba (Ivory Coast), Akasinsa (Uganda), Ita, Ohia (Nigeria), Mrinde, Mrunde (Tanzania)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Trees are found in western, central, and parts of eastern Africa; locally frequent in the drier high forests</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - Heartwood and sapwood not clearly demarcated, whitish or light yellow, becoming grayish-white on exposure often with dark irregular markings; texture rather fine to coarse; grain straight to irregular, wavy, or interlocked; lustrous</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Heavy, with air-dry density of 800 kg/m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Non-durable, highly susceptible to attack by decay and staining fungi as well as insect damage, including powder-post beetle attack</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Moderately strong</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - The tree is extremely rare in Liberia</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Generally reported easy to work in machining operations but rather difficult with hand tools; tearing of interlocked grain in planning, poor surfaces in shaping; nails and glues easily; moderate steam-bending qualities</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> -  Flooring, tool handles, plywood, general construction, decorative veneer etc.</li>
		  </ul>

Celtis spp


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Chlorophora sp</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Moraceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Semli (Sierra Leone, Liberia), Odoum (Ghana, Ivory Coast), Iroko, Oroko (Nigeria), Abang, Mandji (Cameroon, Gabon), Mereira (Angola), Kambala (Zaire), Mvule (East Africa).</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - The two species, between them, extend across the entire width of tropical Africa. C. regia limited to the extreme west of Africa from Gambia to Ghana and is less drought resistant</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - Heartwood varies from a pale yellowish-brown to dark chocolate brown with lighter marking. Sapwood yellowish-white, clearly demarcated. Texture medium to coarse; grain typically interlocked, sometimes irregular; slightly greasy feel; without odor.</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Moderately heavy, air-dry density of 688 kg/m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Heartwood is highly durable, resistant to termite and marine borer attack</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Moderately strong</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Small </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - The tree grows in all forest parts of Liberia but more abundant in the drier forest zone of the country.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Works fairly easily with hand or machine tools but with some tearing of interlocked grain.</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Suggested as a teak substitute. Joinery, boatbuilding, piling and marine work, domestic flooring, furniture, veneer, railroad crossties, cabinetwork, shop fittings</li>
		  </ul>

Chlorophora sp


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Chrysophyllum spp</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Sapotaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Kali, Mukali (Angola), Nom abam (Cameroon), Aniegre (Ivory Coast), Kararo (Ethiopia), Asanfena (Ghana), Mukangu, Muna (Kenya), Londojan (Nigeria), Osan (Uganda), M’boul (CAR), Tutu (DRC)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Liberia - Uganda and Congo</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - The wood is light brown or pinkish brown to almost white. The texture is fine to medium, and the grain is straight to interlock. The luster is rather low.</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Very heavy, with air-dry density of 961kg/m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Poorly durable, to non-durable</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Strong</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - The tree grows in all forest parts of Liberia but rather common in the central north- western part of the country.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - The wood can be finished smoothly, but requires wear-resistant cutters for satisfactory machining.</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - General construction, carpentry, furniture, and turnery</li>
		  </ul>

Chrysophyllum spp


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Combretodendron macrocarpum</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Lecythidaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Abalé (Ivory Coast), Owewe (Nigeria), Abing (Cameroon), Abin (Gabon), Minzu (Zaire).</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Guinea – Angola</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - Heartwood reddish to dark red-brown, sometimes with darker streaks; sapwood yellowish-white, clearly demarcated. Texture fine to moderately coarse; grain varying from straight to interlocked; when freshly-cut wood has a rotten cabbage odor which disappears on drying</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Heavy, with air-dry density of  848 kg/m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Moderately durable, heartwood is resistant to moderately resistant to attack by decay fungi and termites, sometimes damaged by pinhole borers.</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Moderately strong</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - The tree grows in all forest part of the Liberia but preferably abundant in the northern part of  the country.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Rather difficult to work, saws moderately well, dresses to good finish but there is tearing of interlocked grain, may char in boring, has poor steam- bending qualities, glues satisfactorily.</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Sliced to produce decorative veneers, heavy construction work where end splitting and checking are not objectionable.</li>
		  </ul>

Combretodendron macrocarpum


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Copaifera salikounda</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Leguminosae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Entedua (Ghana), Ovbialeke (Nigeria), Etimoe (Ivory Coast), Esak (Cameroon), Akpaflo (Benin), Andem-evine, Anzem noir (Gabon), Bilombi, Yama (CAR)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - It grows from Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia to Ghana</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - The heartwood is gray with a pink tint when it is freshly cut, but, after it has been exposed to the air, oxidation gives it a decidedly red or reddish brown color; it has a moderately high luster; texture is medium, and the grain is usually interlocked and even irregular </li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Moderately Heavy, with air-dry density of 710 kg/m3  </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Durable, but sapwood is susceptible to attack by insect borers</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Moderately strong</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Comparatively Large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - The tree grows in all forest part of Liberia but preferable abundant in the central north-west of the country. </li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Works well with hand and machine tools though it has a tendency to chip off and to blunt cutting edges; glues and polishes well. It is advisable to pre-bore before nailing and screwing</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Produces beautiful veneer for paneling, fine furniture and cabinets</li>
		  </ul>

Copaifera salikounda


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Cynometra ananta</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Leguminosae-Caes.</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Apome (English), Nganga, Ekop-nganga (Cameroon), Mkokom (Equatorial Guinea), Baraka, Wehu (DRC)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Liberia, Ivory Coast, Ghana</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - The heartwood is reddish brown, quite distinct from the light brown sapwood. The grain may be straight, but it usually is interlocked; texture is rather fine</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Very heavy, with air-dry density of 910–1000 kg/m³</li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - The wood is durable, resistant to termite and lyctus attacks.</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Strong</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - Found in all forest parts  of Liberia but more abundant in the drier forest zone of the country.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - It is not easy to work when it is dry, for it is rather flinty to cut across the grain. It can be machined smoothly.</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - The timber is used in bridge building, railway work and heavy construction. The wood is used locally for timbers and posts. It probably is suitable for railway cross ties, bridge timbers, and other heavy construction.</li>
		  </ul>

Cynometra ananta


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Daniellia thurifera </li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Caesalpiniaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Ogea, Ehyedua, Shedua (Ghana), Oziya, Daniellia (Nigeria), Faro, Ogea (Ivory Coast), Nsou (Cameroon), N’su (Equatorial Guinea), Jatin (Benin), Lonlaviol (Gabon), Bolengu (DRC), Gbessi (S/ Leone)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Spanned the coast of  West Africa</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - The sapwood is whitish; it has a thickness of 10 to 18 cm. The heartwood is pale pinkish brown to reddish brown with greenish-brown streaks, it is clearly demarcated; grain straight or slightly interlocked, with medium to coarse texture.</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Light, with air-dry density of 496 kg/m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Non-durable; important risks of decay attacks at any processing step, from logs up to final products</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Medium</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Comparatively Large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - The tree grows almost in all forest parts of Liberia but more abundant in the wet ever green  forest zone of the country.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Works easily with hand and machine tools; nails and glues well. </li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Core stock for plywood, joinery, general millwork, furniture components, boxes and crates, a decorative veneer can be produced from selected logs.</li>
		  </ul>

Daniellia thurifera


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Dialium aubreviellie</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Leguminosae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Khleng (Thailand), Xoay, Kralanh (Cambodia), Kerandji (Indonesia) </li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Spanned the West coast of Africa, mostly found on flat and hilly lands but not in swamps.</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - Heartwood generally golden-brown or red-brown when freshly cut but darkening on exposure, some species becoming almost black; sapwood white to yellowish-white, distinct. Texture moderately fine to somewhat coarse; grain interlocked to wavy; moderately to highly lustrous; without distinctive odor or taste; ripple marks prominent.</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> -  961kg/m3. air-dry density over green weight </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Moderately durable </li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Strong</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - The tree grows in all forest parts of the country but preferable abundant in the drier north-western forest zone of Liberia.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Difficult to saw and machine because of the high density, rapid dulling of cutters, dresses smoothly</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Carpenter tools, tool handles, industrial flooring, machinery parts, heavy construction</li>
		  </ul>

Dialium aubreviellie


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Didelotia idea</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Caesalpiniaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Bondu (Liberia), Angok, Towe (Gabon), Ekop-gombe, Combe (Cameroon), Timba (S/ Leone), Broutou, Toubaouate (Ivory Coast)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Distributed in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - The heartwood is pinkish red, turning reddish brown upon drying, and is distinctly demarcated from the up to 7.5 cm wide, yellowish brown to reddish brown sapwood. The grain is straight or slightly interlocked, texture coarse and even</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - moderately heavy, with air-dry density of 650 kg/m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Heartwood is only moderately durable, being susceptible to attacks by fungi, termites and pinhole borers</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Moderately strong</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Comparatively Large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - The tree grows in all forest parts of Liberia but preferably abundant in moist evergreen forest.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - The wood works fairly well with both hand and machine tools; holds nails and screws well, and glues satisfactorily </li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> -  It is suitable for light construction, light flooring, joinery, interior trim, ship building, vehicle bodies, furniture, ladders, toys, novelties, boxes, crates, tool handles, draining boards, turnery, veneer, plywood, hardboard and particle board</li>
		  </ul>

Didelotia idea


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Disthemonathus benthamianus</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Ceasalpinnaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> -  Barré (Ivory Coast), Bonsamdua (Ghana), Eyèn (Cameroon), Ayanran (Nigeria), Movingui, (Gabon) Monkey can’t Climb</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Widely but sparsely distributed throughout the high forests of West Africa </li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - Heartwood yellowish to yellow-brown, sometimes with dark streaking; sapwood narrow, whitish or straw colored, fairly distinct. Texture fine; grain often interlocked, sometimes wavy; lustrous; some logs produce a decorative figure.</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Moderately heavy, with air-dry density of 720 kg/ m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Heartwood is moderately durable and moderately resistant to termite attack.</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Moderately strong</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Small </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - In Liberia, it is found in all forest parts of the country but more frequent in drier forest zone of the country.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Works fairly readily with machine and hand tools. Takes a good finish, good gluing properties, easy to peel into veneers, moderately good steam-bending properties.</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Furniture, cabinetwork, joinery, flooring, decorative veneers. It is suggested as an oak alternative.</li>
		  </ul>

Disthemonathus benthamianus


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Entandrophragma angolense</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Meliaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Mukusu (Uganda), Tiama (Ivory Coast), Edinam (Ghana), Acuminata, Livuite (Angola), Abeba (Cameroon), Gedu nohor (Nigeria), Lifaki, Vovo (DRC), Dongomanguila (E. Guinea), Abeubegne (Gabon)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - French Guinea to Angola and eastward through the Congo to the Sudan and Uganda</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - The heartwood is generally a dull reddish-brown and distinct from the sapwood, which may be up to 4 inches thick. Texture is similar to Mahogany and khaya; grain is interlocked</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - moderately heavy, with air-dry density of 545kg/m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Heartwood is  moderately durable and extremely resistant to preservative treatment</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Medium</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Comparatively Large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - It is found all over Liberia, in high forests as well as secondary formations. Its frequency is higher in the south eastern forest zone of the country.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Works rather easily with hand and machine tools, but there is tearing of interlocked grain; otherwise a good finish is obtained in most operations. The wood finishes and stains well and provides satisfactory glue bonds. It nails and screws well.</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Tiama provides both plain and decorative veneer and is used extensively in this form. Other uses include furniture and cabinet making and, to a certain extent, boat construction.</li>
		  </ul>

Entandrophragma angolense


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Entandrophragma candollei</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Meliaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Omu (Nigeria), Candollei (Ghana), Kosipo (Liberia)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - West Africa to Angola and the Congo region; in evergreen, moist, and semi- deciduous forest.</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - Heartwood dull brown or purple-brown and clearly demarcated from the whitish to pale brown sapwood; texture rather coarse; grain generally inter-locked; without distinctive odor or taste.</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Moderately heavy, with air-dry density of 720 kg/m3  </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Heartwood moderately durable and moderately resistant to termite attack.</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Medium</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> -  Comparatively large</li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> -  The tree can be found in all forest parts of the country but more abundant especially in transitional formations.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Rather difficult to saw, works readily with band and machine tools, tends to tear interlocked grain, polishes and finishes well.</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Joinery, furniture and cabinetwork, flooring, decorative veneers, plywood, boat construction.</li>
		  </ul>

Entandrophragma candollei


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Entandrophragma cylindricum</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Meliaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Aboudikro (Ivory Coast), Penkwa (Ghana), Muyovu (Uganda), Sapelli (Cameroon), Libuyu (Zaire)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Sierra Leone to Angola and eastward through the Congo to Uganda.</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - Heartwood-medium to fairly dark reddish-brown or purplish-brown; sapwood whitish or pale yellow, distinct. Texture rather fine; grain interlocked, sometimes wavy, producing a narrow, uniform, roe figure on quartered surfaces; lustrous; without a distinctive taste but with a cedar-like scent.</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Moderately heavy, with air-dry density of 623 kg/m3 </li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Heartwood is moderately durable and as resistant to preservative treatment.</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Medium</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - comparatively large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - Grows throughout Liberia but more frequently in the moist evergreen forests zone of the country.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Works fairly easily with machine tools, although interlocked grain offers difficulties in planing and molding; finishes and glues well; works quite well with hand and machine tools</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Furniture and cabinetwork, decorative veneers, plywood, joinery, flooring, paneling</li>
		  </ul>

Entandrophragma cylindricum


		  <ul>
		  <li><b>SCIENTIFIC NAME</b> - Entandrophragma utile</li>
		  <li><b>FAMILY</b> - Meliaceae</li>
		  <li><b>TRADE NAME</b> - Efuodwe (Ghana), Sipo (Ivory Coast), Okeong (Nigeria), Assié (Cameroon), Kosi-Kosi (Gabon), Mufumbi (Uganda)</li>
		  <li><b>DISTRIBUTION</b> - Principally from West and Central Africa</li>
		  <li><b>WOOD</b> - Heartwood fairly uniform red- or purple-brown; well demarcated from the light-brown sapwood. Texture medium; grain interlocked and rather irregular, faint cedar-like scent. Timber is corrosive to metals.</li>
		  <li><b>WEIGHT</b> - Moderately heavy, with air-dry density of 657kg/m3</li>
		  <li><b>DURABILITY</b> - Heartwood is durable and  extremely resistant to preservative treatment</li>
		  <li><b>STRENGTH</b> - Medium</li>
		  <li><b>SHRINKAGE</b> - Comparatively large </li>
		  <li><b>FOREST AVAILABILITY</b> - Can be found in both north and southern part of Liberia, but most abundant in the south east of Liberia.</li>
		  <li><b>WORKING PROPERTY</b> - Works fairly easily with hand and machine tools, interlocked grain may cause tearing in planning and shaping, finishes well, glues and nails easily</li>
		  <li><b>USES</b> - Furniture and cabinetwork, joinery, decorative veneers and plywood, boat construction</li>
		  </ul>

Entandrophragma utile

 
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